Outlook07-message with mp3 attachment won't send/stalls in outbox

J

jani

)I can recieve mp3 attachments, multiple pictures, files, etc. but when I try
to send more than 3 pictures or one mp3 (9.43 to 13.0mb size), outlook stalls
and doesn't allow me to send any emails with these attachments. I can send
regular files with no problem but not these. It is frustrating, does anyone
know how I can fix this in Outlook so it will work? Thanks
jani
 
V

VanguardLH

jani wrote:

> )I can recieve mp3 attachments, multiple pictures, files, etc. but when I try
> to send more than 3 pictures or one mp3 (9.43 to 13.0mb size), outlook stalls
> and doesn't allow me to send any emails with these attachments. I can send
> regular files with no problem but not these. It is frustrating, does anyone
> know how I can fix this in Outlook so it will work? Thanks


And what is your e-mail provider's anti-abuse/spam quota on the maximum size
of e-mails sent through them?

Look at the Size column in Outlook in the Drafts or Outbox folder to see
what is the actual size of your e-mail. All e-mail gets sent as text.
HTML, RTF, binary attachments - doesn't matter. It all gets sent as text.
Attachments have to get encoded into long text strings inside MIME parts in
the body of your e-mail. That encoding bloats the size of the file by 137%,
or more (usually much more). So if, for example, your e-mail provider has a
maximum size of 10MB for an e-mail message sent through them, your 9MB
binary attachment along with the headers and body of your e-mail would
obviously exceed their anti-abuse quota for your personal-use account. 13MB
would definitely exceed their quota max.

E-mail is NOT a reliable file transfer mechanism. It wasn't intended or
designed for that. It was designed to send lots of small messages. There
is no CRC check on the file to ensure integrity. There is no resume to
re-retrieve the file if the e-mail download fails. There is no guarantee
the e-mail will arrive uncorrupted. Large e-mails can generate timeouts and
retries due to the delay when anti-virus programs interrogate their content.

Do not use e-mail to send large files. It is rude to the recipient. Not
every recipient might want your large file. Not every recipient has
high-speed broadband Internet access. Many users still use slow dial-up
access, especially if all they do is e-mail. You waste your e-mail
provider's disk space and their bandwidth to send a huge e-mail. You waste
the e-mail provider's disk space and bandwidth at the recipient's end. You
eat up the disk quota for the recipient's mailbox (which could render it
unusable so further e-mails get rejected due to a full mailbox). You
irritate users still on dial-up that have to wait eons waiting to download
your huge e-mail. Some users have usage quotas (i.e., so many bytes/month)
and you waste it with a file that they may not want. Don't be insensitive
to recipients of your e-mails. Take the large file out of the e-mail.

Save the file in online storage and send the recipient a URL link to the
file. Your e-mail remains small. It is more likely to arrive. It is more
likely to be seen. The recipient can decide whether or not and when to
download your large file. Be polite by sending small e-mails.

Your ISP probably allows many gigabytes of online storage for personal web
pages. Upload your file there and provide a URL link to it. Other methods
(of using online storage), all free, are:

http://www.adrive.com/ (50GB max quota, 2GB max file size)
http://www.driveway.com/ (500MB max file size)
http://www.filefactory.com/ (300MB max file size)
http://www.megashares.com/ (10GB max file size)
http://www.sendspace.com/ (300MB max file size)
http://www.spread-it.com/ (500MB max file size)
http://www.transferbigfiles.com/ (1GB max file size)
http://zshare.net/ (500MB max file size)
http://www.zupload.com/ (500MB max file size)

If it is sensitive content and when storing it online in a public storage
area or to guard it against whomever operates the online storage service,
remember to encrypt it.
 
J

jani

When i called my provider they told me I had up to 100 mb but I'm concluding
that person didn't really know-that must have been incoming. They also said
it was MS Outlook that was limiting me.
Anyway this is very helpful, but I still don't understand why some folks can
send me an email with lots of pictures attached. I can only send a max. of
about 3. Is it that their providers alllow more? Thanks for your help.
jani

"VanguardLH" wrote:

> jani wrote:
>
> > )I can recieve mp3 attachments, multiple pictures, files, etc. but when I try
> > to send more than 3 pictures or one mp3 (9.43 to 13.0mb size), outlook stalls
> > and doesn't allow me to send any emails with these attachments. I can send
> > regular files with no problem but not these. It is frustrating, does anyone
> > know how I can fix this in Outlook so it will work? Thanks

>
> And what is your e-mail provider's anti-abuse/spam quota on the maximum size
> of e-mails sent through them?
>
> Look at the Size column in Outlook in the Drafts or Outbox folder to see
> what is the actual size of your e-mail. All e-mail gets sent as text.
> HTML, RTF, binary attachments - doesn't matter. It all gets sent as text.
> Attachments have to get encoded into long text strings inside MIME parts in
> the body of your e-mail. That encoding bloats the size of the file by 137%,
> or more (usually much more). So if, for example, your e-mail provider has a
> maximum size of 10MB for an e-mail message sent through them, your 9MB
> binary attachment along with the headers and body of your e-mail would
> obviously exceed their anti-abuse quota for your personal-use account. 13MB
> would definitely exceed their quota max.
>
> E-mail is NOT a reliable file transfer mechanism. It wasn't intended or
> designed for that. It was designed to send lots of small messages. There
> is no CRC check on the file to ensure integrity. There is no resume to
> re-retrieve the file if the e-mail download fails. There is no guarantee
> the e-mail will arrive uncorrupted. Large e-mails can generate timeouts and
> retries due to the delay when anti-virus programs interrogate their content.
>
> Do not use e-mail to send large files. It is rude to the recipient. Not
> every recipient might want your large file. Not every recipient has
> high-speed broadband Internet access. Many users still use slow dial-up
> access, especially if all they do is e-mail. You waste your e-mail
> provider's disk space and their bandwidth to send a huge e-mail. You waste
> the e-mail provider's disk space and bandwidth at the recipient's end. You
> eat up the disk quota for the recipient's mailbox (which could render it
> unusable so further e-mails get rejected due to a full mailbox). You
> irritate users still on dial-up that have to wait eons waiting to download
> your huge e-mail. Some users have usage quotas (i.e., so many bytes/month)
> and you waste it with a file that they may not want. Don't be insensitive
> to recipients of your e-mails. Take the large file out of the e-mail.
>
> Save the file in online storage and send the recipient a URL link to the
> file. Your e-mail remains small. It is more likely to arrive. It is more
> likely to be seen. The recipient can decide whether or not and when to
> download your large file. Be polite by sending small e-mails.
>
> Your ISP probably allows many gigabytes of online storage for personal web
> pages. Upload your file there and provide a URL link to it. Other methods
> (of using online storage), all free, are:
>
> http://www.adrive.com/ (50GB max quota, 2GB max file size)
> http://www.driveway.com/ (500MB max file size)
> http://www.filefactory.com/ (300MB max file size)
> http://www.megashares.com/ (10GB max file size)
> http://www.sendspace.com/ (300MB max file size)
> http://www.spread-it.com/ (500MB max file size)
> http://www.transferbigfiles.com/ (1GB max file size)
> http://zshare.net/ (500MB max file size)
> http://www.zupload.com/ (500MB max file size)
>
> If it is sensitive content and when storing it online in a public storage
> area or to guard it against whomever operates the online storage service,
> remember to encrypt it.
> .
>

 
V

VanguardLH

jani wrote:

> When i called my provider they told me I had up to 100 mb but I'm concluding
> that person didn't really know-that must have been incoming. They also said
> it was MS Outlook that was limiting me.
> Anyway this is very helpful, but I still don't understand why some folks can
> send me an email with lots of pictures attached. I can only send a max. of
> about 3. Is it that their providers alllow more? Thanks for your help.


100MB sounds ridiculously big for e-mail size if you are talking about a
personal-use (free or paid) account. I don't recall any personal-use e-mail
providers that allow messages that big. More likely the tech rep was
talking about your disk quota: the total amount of disk space allocated to
your account for ALL your storage of e-mails (sometimes they exclude the
Junk and Trash folders, sometimes not). That would be the total disk space
for all your e-mails, not for each e-mail. You never identified the e-mail
provider. You might want to read the web help pages to see if they mention
the quotas on disk space for your account and maximum message size.

Sending lots of pictures in an e-mail does not equate to a huge-sized
e-mail. Those senders might be compressing the JPEG files (which is lossly
compression) before they send to get their e-mails under their quota for max
message size. You didn't mention how big in bytes are their e-mails that
you receive.

Outlook doesn't limit the size of its messages. It won't know and doesn't
care about quotas established by the flood of e-mail providers and what
services they choose to provide or what limits they place on them.

If you enable e-mail scanning in your anti-virus software (which is
superfluous as it provides no additional protection over the on-access
scanner), the problem could be the delay incurred by your AV program to
interrogate those huge-sized e-mails. Disable e-mail scanning in your AV
program and retest. Sometimes disabling the e-mail scanner is not
sufficient because your e-mail traffic still goes through their transparent
proxy but doesn't get interrogated for its content. You have to uninstall
the AV program and then do a custom install that omits their e-mail scan
component. You didn't mention if you use an AV program or what it is.
 
J

jani

My provider is ATT Uverse, which uses Yahoo or ATT Yahoo, my AV is Kaspersky.
Thanks you for your great help, I think I understand what is going on. I will
disable the email scanning on Kaspersky and see if I can send out more than 3
picutres on an email. I appreciate your help.
jani

"VanguardLH" wrote:

> jani wrote:
>
> > When i called my provider they told me I had up to 100 mb but I'm concluding
> > that person didn't really know-that must have been incoming. They also said
> > it was MS Outlook that was limiting me.
> > Anyway this is very helpful, but I still don't understand why some folks can
> > send me an email with lots of pictures attached. I can only send a max. of
> > about 3. Is it that their providers alllow more? Thanks for your help.

>
> 100MB sounds ridiculously big for e-mail size if you are talking about a
> personal-use (free or paid) account. I don't recall any personal-use e-mail
> providers that allow messages that big. More likely the tech rep was
> talking about your disk quota: the total amount of disk space allocated to
> your account for ALL your storage of e-mails (sometimes they exclude the
> Junk and Trash folders, sometimes not). That would be the total disk space
> for all your e-mails, not for each e-mail. You never identified the e-mail
> provider. You might want to read the web help pages to see if they mention
> the quotas on disk space for your account and maximum message size.
>
> Sending lots of pictures in an e-mail does not equate to a huge-sized
> e-mail. Those senders might be compressing the JPEG files (which is lossly
> compression) before they send to get their e-mails under their quota for max
> message size. You didn't mention how big in bytes are their e-mails that
> you receive.
>
> Outlook doesn't limit the size of its messages. It won't know and doesn't
> care about quotas established by the flood of e-mail providers and what
> services they choose to provide or what limits they place on them.
>
> If you enable e-mail scanning in your anti-virus software (which is
> superfluous as it provides no additional protection over the on-access
> scanner), the problem could be the delay incurred by your AV program to
> interrogate those huge-sized e-mails. Disable e-mail scanning in your AV
> program and retest. Sometimes disabling the e-mail scanner is not
> sufficient because your e-mail traffic still goes through their transparent
> proxy but doesn't get interrogated for its content. You have to uninstall
> the AV program and then do a custom install that omits their e-mail scan
> component. You didn't mention if you use an AV program or what it is.
> .
>

 

Brian Tillman

Senior Member
"jani" <jani> wrote in message
news:01D52D97-2951-456E-9406-3C9BB40FE506@microsoft.com...

> My provider is ATT Uverse, which uses Yahoo or ATT Yahoo, my AV is
> Kaspersky.
> Thanks you for your great help, I think I understand what is going on. I
> will
> disable the email scanning on Kaspersky and see if I can send out more than
> 3
> picutres on an email. I appreciate your help.


It may take more than simply disabling it. It may take uninstalling Kaspersky
completely and then reinstalling without the mail scanner.

 
V

VanguardLH

jani wrote:

> My provider is ATT Uverse, which uses Yahoo or ATT Yahoo, my AV is Kaspersky.
> Thanks you for your great help, I think I understand what is going on. I will
> disable the email scanning on Kaspersky and see if I can send out more than 3
> picutres on an email. I appreciate your help.


http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/mail/yahoomail/basics/basics-18.html;_ylt=AlJekvAAJfDPOkVDB.eUjMuI7CN4

So my guess for a 10MB maximum size for an e-mail was correct. See my prior
reply. You never stated what was the size of your e-mail AFTER you added
the attachments. Both the numbers you gave as examples (of file sizes
BEFORE you attached those files) would have definitely put you over their
10MB anti-abuse quota for a personal-use account.

It's not how many images or attachments you are adding. It's you exceeding
the maximum size permitted by your e-mail provider for a message (and that
is AFTER the file gets encoded into the e-mail).
 

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