Minimize to tray on clicking X

Status
Not open for further replies.
J

John

Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?
 
D

dlw

you mean "close" it but still have it notify you of new mail? No, but there

are 3rd party applications that do that.

"John" wrote:


> Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?
> .
>
 
J

JonC

In article <BA7B88A4-741E-4409-AFB3-0E35E41482E1@microsoft.com>,

dlw says...

> you mean "close" it but still have it notify you of new mail? No, but there
> are 3rd party applications that do that.

> "John" wrote:
>
> > Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?
> > .
> >


http://tinyurl.com/23y77gc

Hide when minimised.

This also shows mail alert if you tick the box after a right click on

the minimised icon.
 
V

VanguardLH

JonC wrote:


> dlw says...
>
> > John wrote:
> >
> >> Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?

>

>> you mean "close" it but still have it notify you of new mail? No, but
> > there are 3rd party applications that do that.


> http://tinyurl.com/23y77gc

> Hide when minimised. This also shows mail alert if you tick the box after
> a right click on the minimised icon.


So you can see to where the TinyURL redirect takes you BEFORE you go there,

add the "preview" host to the domain name, as in:

http://preview.tinyurl.com/23y77gc

The setting mentioned there will minimize Outlook to a tray icon. It only

works when minimizing the window for Outlook. Clicking on the "X" titlebar

button in Outlook's window or using its File -> Exit menu results in

exiting Outlook.
 
J

JonC

In article <hsfa2s$60b$1@news.albasani.net>, V@nguard.LH says...

> JonC wrote:
>
> > dlw says...
> >
> >> John wrote:
> >
> >>> Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?
> >
> >> you mean "close" it but still have it notify you of new mail? No, but
> >> there are 3rd party applications that do that.

> > http://tinyurl.com/23y77gc
> > Hide when minimised. This also shows mail alert if you tick the box after
> > a right click on the minimised icon.


> So you can see to where the TinyURL redirect takes you BEFORE you go there,
> add the "preview" host to the domain name, as in:

> http://preview.tinyurl.com/23y77gc

> The setting mentioned there will minimize Outlook to a tray icon. It only
> works when minimizing the window for Outlook. Clicking on the "X" titlebar
> button in Outlook's window or using its File -> Exit menu results in
> exiting Outlook.


Ihave one icon in the system tray and none on the task bar.

When minimised to the system tray it shows any incoming mail.

To maximise outlook, I double click on the system tray icon.
 
V

VanguardLH

JonC wrote:


> VanguardLH says...
>

>> JonC wrote:
> >
> >> dlw says...
> >
>>>> John wrote:
> >>
>>>>> Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?
> >>
>>>> you mean "close" it but still have it notify you of new mail? No, but
> >>> there are 3rd party applications that do that.
> >
>>> http://tinyurl.com/23y77gc
> >
>>> Hide when minimised. This also shows mail alert if you tick the box after
> >> a right click on the minimised icon.

>

>> So you can see to where the TinyURL redirect takes you BEFORE you go there,
> > add the "preview" host to the domain name, as in:
>

>> http://preview.tinyurl.com/23y77gc
>

>> The setting mentioned there will minimize Outlook to a tray icon. It only
> > works when minimizing the window for Outlook. Clicking on the "X" titlebar
> > button in Outlook's window or using its File -> Exit menu results in
> > exiting Outlook.


> Ihave one icon in the system tray and none on the task bar. When
> minimised to the system tray it shows any incoming mail. To maximise
> outlook, I double click on the system tray icon.


Not the issue being asked by the OP. Enabling the minimize option does

NOT override the "X" exit button in the titlebar of the app. To avoid

accidentally hitting the "X" exit button instead of the "_" minimize

button, I would suggest the OP start clicking on the taskbar button for

Outlook to toggle its window (and minimize it which would then make the

window and taskbar button disappear and leave only the tray icon).

(Note to JonC: You have Gravity configured to put the poster's e-mail

address in your attribution line instead of their name. No one here

really cares what e-mail address the poster claims is theirs, especially

since it may be bogus or munged.)
 
J

JonC

In article <hsfc27$8rm$1@news.albasani.net>, V@nguard.LH says...

> JonC wrote:
>
> > VanguardLH says...
> >
> >> JonC wrote:
> >
> >>> dlw says...
> >>
> >>>> John wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>> Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?
> >>>
> >>>> you mean "close" it but still have it notify you of new mail? No, but
> >>>> there are 3rd party applications that do that.
> >>
> >>> http://tinyurl.com/23y77gc
> >>
> >>> Hide when minimised. This also shows mail alert if you tick the box after
> >>> a right click on the minimised icon.
> >
> >> So you can see to where the TinyURL redirect takes you BEFORE you go there,
> >> add the "preview" host to the domain name, as in:
> >
> >> http://preview.tinyurl.com/23y77gc
> >
> >> The setting mentioned there will minimize Outlook to a tray icon. It only
> >> works when minimizing the window for Outlook. Clicking on the "X" titlebar
> >> button in Outlook's window or using its File -> Exit menu results in
> >> exiting Outlook.

> > Ihave one icon in the system tray and none on the task bar. When
> > minimised to the system tray it shows any incoming mail. To maximise
> > outlook, I double click on the system tray icon.


> Not the issue being asked by the OP. Enabling the minimize option does
> NOT override the "X" exit button in the titlebar of the app. To avoid
> accidentally hitting the "X" exit button instead of the "_" minimize
> button, I would suggest the OP start clicking on the taskbar button for
> Outlook to toggle its window (and minimize it which would then make the
> window and taskbar button disappear and leave only the tray icon).

> (Note to JonC: You have Gravity configured to put the poster's e-mail
> address in your attribution line instead of their name. No one here
> really cares what e-mail address the poster claims is theirs, especially
> since it may be bogus or munged.)


Thanks for that.
 
J

John

On Wed, 12 May 2010 14:34:02 -0700, dlw wrote:


> you mean "close" it but still have it notify you of new mail? No, but there
> are 3rd party applications that do that.

> "John" wrote:
>
> > Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?
> > .
> >


Would you have a link for these applications please?
 
V

VanguardLH

John wrote:


> dlw wrote:
>
> > John wrote:
> >
> >> Is there a way to minimize Outlook 2007 by clicking on the X button?

>

>> you mean "close" it but still have it notify you of new mail? No,
> > but there are 3rd party applications that do that.


> Would you have a link for these applications please?


PopTray

Magic Mail Monitor

and many others found via Google, like:

http://www.google.com/search?q=+free++e-mail+monitor

You could also search at common download sites, like:

http://www.download.com/

http://www.softpedia.com/

Be aware that most e-mail monitors only work with POP. You didn't

mention what type of e-mail accounts you use (POP, IMAP, HTTP/Deltasync,

or Exchange).

Also be aware that most of these e-mail monitors will consume as much

memory, if not more, than does Outlook. When Outlook is minimized to a

system tray, it relinquishes the GUI resources it needs to paint its

window. This means the resident process for outlook.exe becomes small.

You can see the memory footprint change in Task Manager's Processes tab

when you open the Outlook window and when you minimize it to a tray

icon. Some e-mail monitors do not relinquish their GUI resources so

they are just as big in memory whether their window is displayed or not.

In fact, some e-mail monitors consume more memory than does Outlook when

Outlook's window is displayed. So you really don't end up saving on any

resources by closing Outlook and using an e-mail monitor in its place.

Some e-mail monitors, like the ones that I mentioned above, let you

define rules. You can equate some if not most or all of your Outlook

rules to those you can define inside these e-mail monitors. However,

most e-mail monitors are fairly simplistic and you get no means of

filtering your incoming e-mails.

The only advantage that I've found in using an e-mail monitor over

leaving Outlook minimized to a tray icon is eliminating the bogus errors

that Outlook generates. POP only has 2 statuses: +OK and -ERR. Any

comments the server sends back with the status are non-standard strings

and cannot be used to test the result of a command sent by the client to

the server. So when the server fails to establish a mail session, times

out, or has other problems, all it can send back (if it sends anything)

is the single -ERR code. During a mail establishment, Outlook only

knows it got back an -ERR code and so it reports (often wrongly) that

your login failed. All Outlook knows is that the server failed to

establish a mail session but not really why. Alas, Outlook has no

option to hide its error messages. When the login fails, Outlook shoves

a popup on the screen telling you of the failure. However, if you are

polling your account every 10 minutes for a total of 144 mail polls per

day, you probably don't care if you missed a couple mail polls. This is

why I don't bother using Outlook to connect to my Hotmail accounts via

POP (or their Connector) because Hotmail is not a reliable enough

service to eliminate seeing these bogus prompts (I use my Gmail account

to poll my Hotmail accounts because I don't have login failures with

Gmail). Using an e-mail monitor often helps to eliminate the noise

because some of them have an option to NOT show failed logins. This is

not as bad a problem as I make it sound but getting one or two prompts

about a failed login (due to server-side problems over which I have no

control) over a couple days is too much a nuisance for me to keep

closing those bogus prompt windows.
 
V

VanguardLH

Michael Bauer wrote:


> Please see OLKeeper here, which does exactly what you're asking for:
> http://www.vboffice.net/product.html?lang=en


YIKES!!! At a price of $60, that's damn expensive for the minimum number

of functions (just two) that it provides. And that cost only covers a

single year of updates. At that price, it better come in a gold-gilded

box.
 
J

John

On Thu, 13 May 2010 06:54:34 -0500, VanguardLH wrote:


> Michael Bauer wrote:
>
> > Please see OLKeeper here, which does exactly what you're asking for:
> > http://www.vboffice.net/product.html?lang=en


> YIKES!!! At a price of $60, that's damn expensive for the minimum number
> of functions (just two) that it provides. And that cost only covers a
> single year of updates. At that price, it better come in a gold-gilded
> box.


Yes, this was the same reaction I had when seeing the cost for this

software. I realise that the purchase price is for a site licence but for a

one off home user it's way over priced.
 

Michael Bauer

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2010 32 bit
Email Account
Exchange Server

> Yes, this was the same reaction I had when seeing the cost for this
> software. I realise that the purchase price is for a site licence but for a
> one off home user it's way over priced.


The Add-in is not available for single users. For a company starting with,

say five seats, it's a very good deal.

Best regards

Michael Bauer

 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top