Permissions on public folders

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SmF2YUdpcmw=

We are importing multiple calendars from another calendar program into
Outlook/Exchange 2007. We are making these calendars available to our users
in Public Folders, with specific permissions set for Exchange users. I have
the permissions set on the top level folder, called Project Calendars, and
when I move a calendar into that folder, it assumes the permissions of that
folder. However, if a change is made to the permissions on the top level
folder, that change is not extrapolated to the calendars underneath it. Is
there a way to make these permission inheritable?
 
N

Nikki Peterson

No, however we use PFDavAdmin for mass changes on public
folder perms.

Why do you not use the Xcng2007 resource instead of the
public folders?

Nikki

"JavaGirl" <JavaGirl> wrote in message
news:6BBEC295-4903-44C5-AC29-1B3222BAD3F4@microsoft.com...
We are importing multiple calendars from another calendar program into
Outlook/Exchange 2007. We are making these calendars available to our users
in Public Folders, with specific permissions set for Exchange users. I have
the permissions set on the top level folder, called Project Calendars, and
when I move a calendar into that folder, it assumes the permissions of that
folder. However, if a change is made to the permissions on the top level
folder, that change is not extrapolated to the calendars underneath it. Is
there a way to make these permission inheritable?

 
S

SmF2YUdpcmw=

Nikki, you'll have to excuse my ignorance. I am not an Exchange admin and am
not sure what you are referring to. What exactly do you mean when you refer
to an Xchg2007 resource? Our intent is to let our users to control access to
the resource (in this instance, calendars), and I believe that's the reason
for the decision to place it in Public Folders. The other factor that
probably governed the decision is that not all of our users are currently
using Office 2007; we still have quite a few users on Office 2003. Can you
explain what your are referring to, and what advantages that I would have in
following your suggestion?

Thanks, Marie

"Nikki Peterson" wrote:

> No, however we use PFDavAdmin for mass changes on public
> folder perms.
>
> Why do you not use the Xcng2007 resource instead of the
> public folders?
>
> Nikki
>
> "JavaGirl" <JavaGirl> wrote in message
> news:6BBEC295-4903-44C5-AC29-1B3222BAD3F4@microsoft.com...
> We are importing multiple calendars from another calendar program into
> Outlook/Exchange 2007. We are making these calendars available to our users
> in Public Folders, with specific permissions set for Exchange users. I have
> the permissions set on the top level folder, called Project Calendars, and
> when I move a calendar into that folder, it assumes the permissions of that
> folder. However, if a change is made to the permissions on the top level
> folder, that change is not extrapolated to the calendars underneath it. Is
> there a way to make these permission inheritable?
>
>

 
N

Nikki Peterson

Exchange 2007 has what is called the "Calendar Concierge".
http://www.microsoft.com/exchange/2007/evaluation/features/calendarconcierge.mspx

The introduction to this suite of calendar improvements was
great for us Admins that in the past had to provide these
services through 3rd party and add-on stuff. We would either set
up the Auto Accept Agent or use the "Direct Booking" method.
Now it is built in to the Exchange Server and adds the benefit of
being able to book using Outlook Web Access (OWA) for our
clients. Clients use automation to "Make a Meeting".

Public Folder Calendars are kinda like an electronic wall calendar.
They do not have the "bells and whistles" of a mailbox calendar that
will automate the acceptance by checking for availability and then
based on those findings, book it or deny it. It just posts no matter if
someone else has something for the same time. "Making a meeting"
is a bit different than "Writing it on the Calendar".

James Chong (MVP) offered up a great article explaining:
Exchange 2003 Auto Accept Agent vs. direct booking
http://msexchangeteam.com/archive/2006/02/22/420275.aspx

How to "Direct Book":
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;291616

Nikki

"JavaGirl" <JavaGirl> wrote in message
news:055470F2-A315-483C-B201-F733EDB58B6C@microsoft.com...
Nikki, you'll have to excuse my ignorance. I am not an Exchange admin and
am
not sure what you are referring to. What exactly do you mean when you refer
to an Xchg2007 resource? Our intent is to let our users to control access
to
the resource (in this instance, calendars), and I believe that's the reason
for the decision to place it in Public Folders. The other factor that
probably governed the decision is that not all of our users are currently
using Office 2007; we still have quite a few users on Office 2003. Can you
explain what your are referring to, and what advantages that I would have in
following your suggestion?

Thanks, Marie

"Nikki Peterson" wrote:

> No, however we use PFDavAdmin for mass changes on public
> folder perms.
>
> Why do you not use the Xcng2007 resource instead of the
> public folders?
>
> Nikki
>
> "JavaGirl" <JavaGirl> wrote in message
> news:6BBEC295-4903-44C5-AC29-1B3222BAD3F4@microsoft.com...
> We are importing multiple calendars from another calendar program into
> Outlook/Exchange 2007. We are making these calendars available to our
> users
> in Public Folders, with specific permissions set for Exchange users. I
> have
> the permissions set on the top level folder, called Project Calendars, and
> when I move a calendar into that folder, it assumes the permissions of
> that
> folder. However, if a change is made to the permissions on the top level
> folder, that change is not extrapolated to the calendars underneath it.
> Is
> there a way to make these permission inheritable?
>
>


 
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