Beginner Question - Setting up Outlook Properties for New User

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robinson cruso

I'm a newbie on server systems and exchange server.
My company uses Windows Server 2003.

I have to create a new user in active directory and give him our old worker's information. This is another story.
I have to set up outlook. Is there anything i have to do about outlook or will the server handle everything when i create the user?
Can i show our new worker our old workers mails?
Thank you for your patience and helps.
 
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Ed Crowley [MVP]



You need to create an Outlook profile to identify which mailbox and server the user is to use. (If you have Outlook 2007 and Exchange 2007, this can be pretty much automatic.)





The easiest way to do this is to grant the new user full mailbox access rights on the old mailbox and he can open that mailbox as an additional mailbox in his Outlook profile. Alternatively, the new user can start with the old user's mailbox by creating a new user account without a mailbox and reconnecting the old mailbox to the new user's account. However, this method has some side effects the new user might find undesirable, so I don't recommend it.
--

Ed Crowley MVP
"There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."
.



"robinson cruso" wrote in message news:c05cd219-221e-46ed-88b6-83e83deb69b8...

I'm a newbie on server systems and exchange server.
My company uses Windows Server 2003.

I have to create a new user in active directory and give him our old worker's information. This is another story.
I have to set up outlook. Is there anything i have to do about outlook or will the server handle everything when i create the user?
Can i show our new worker our old workers mails?
Thank you for your patience and helps. Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."
 
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robinson cruso

Thank you for the clear explanation. Now i'm home but i'll give it a try tomorrow at work.
I found an option (give/take in Turkish). I created a pst file including all folders with old user's account. Than i give full access permission to new user on this file.
Than i changed account and try to add this pst file to new user's account but it gave error. Error message was something like "pst file cannot be opened". Is it possible this way or can this pst file only be added by the creator's account?
Another thing is, i'll disable the old user's account. if i use your method, can new user still see old user's mails?
 
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Ben M. Schorr [MVP]

Thank you for the clear explanation. Now i'm home but i'll give it a try tomorrow at work.
I found an option (give/take in Turkish). I created a pst file including all folders with old user's account. Than i give full access permission to new user on this file.
Than i changed account and try to add this pst file to new user's account but it gave error. Error message was something like "pst file cannot be opened". Is it possible this way or can this pst file only be added by the creator's account?
Another thing is, i'll disable the old user's account. if i use your method, can new user still see old user's mails?

Is the old user's PST file on a hard drive or a CD? The new user has to have read & write permissions to that file.

 
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Samer F. Mustafa

my friend, you just mentioned that you have created an AD Account so the user can use any pc at the company and logon, if you have exchange 2007 or 2010 with auto discovery enabled the just open the outlook 2007 and it wil configure everything, but if you have exchange 2003 then you have to configure outlook for for exchange server. regarding let the user log on using other account then you have to create new profile and configure it (I do not recommend this solution). Samer F. Mustafa Sr. Microsoft Platform System Engineer sf_mustafa@hotmail.com
 
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robinson cruso

File is on hard-drive but there was an error at the process. I understand from your message that if user has permissions there'll be no problem adding those mails to his account. I'll try it again so.
 
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robinson cruso

I was wrong. AD is activated on our server but we're adding users on the Server Manager Local Users. But it's a single server system with thin clients so you're right, every user can access it's account from all clients. I'm not sure now but i think we've office 2007 and exchange server 2007, because it nearly configures everyhing. We want user to use his account from the beginning for security, so we've to set up his account free of problems.
 
E

Ed Crowley [MVP]



All Exchange users must have domain accounts. If you have just one server and it's a domain controller, then there's no such thing as local users.
--

Ed Crowley MVP
"There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."
.



"robinson cruso" wrote in message news:373b65fe-3840-4c46-b52c-bf6ddd1c8f34...

I was wrong. AD is activated on our server but we're adding users on the Server Manager Local Users. But it's a single server system with thin clients so you're right, every user can access it's account from all clients. I'm not sure now but i think we've office 2007 and exchange server 2007, because it nearly configures everyhing. We want user to use his account from the beginning for security, so we've to set up his account free of problems. Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."
 
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Ben M. Schorr [MVP]

I was wrong. AD is activated on our server but we're adding users on the Server Manager Local Users. But it's a single server system with thin clients so you're right, every user can access it's account from all clients. I'm not sure now but i think we've office 2007 and exchange server 2007, because it nearly configures everyhing. We want user to use his account from the beginning for security, so we've to set up his account free of problems.

Thin clients? So Outlook is running on a Terminal Server or Citrix Server?

 
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