A question about installing office 2013 Pro and using my .pst from office 2010

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e_a_g_l_e_p_i

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2010 32 bit
Email Account
POP3
I was given a link to your tutorial for upgrading from Outlook older versions to Outlook newer versions. I just want to double check and make sure that I'm going to do this correctly, so I will post my original question that I asked in the Microsoft Office forum and they referred me to Diane's tutorial like.

Moving Outlook to a new Windows computer

I just want to make sure that in my situation I do everything correctly so I don't screw things up, so I'm posting here as well with the same information hoping that somebody maybe even Diane can answer the questions I have about going from Office 2010 to Office 2013 Pro and moving my email data from 2010 to 2013.

Below is my original post,


Hello,
I have been using Outlook 2010 for several years, back a few years ago I bought a full version of office 2013 Pro but never installed it, at the time I wasn't real thrilled with the colors. I'm not into pastels, so I never did install it.

I now have to install a new solid-state hard drive, a new full version of Windows 10, and I thought it would be a good time to install Office 2013 Pro. From what I'm reading on the Internet is not as simple as saving my .pst from 2010 and copying over the .pst like I always did when I had to reinstall office 2010.

Is there going to be a problem going from 2010 to 2013 Pro and keeping all my emails, contacts and calendars?

If there are any tutorials out there that show how to go from Outlook 2010 to Outlook 2013 Pro I would appreciate if somebody could direct me to the tutorials.

If it's not a difficult procedure I would appreciate if someone could explain to me the best way to do it here in the forum.

Thanks

Ron
 

Diane Poremsky

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2016 32 bit
Email Account
Office 365 Exchange
I now have to install a new solid-state hard drive, a new full version of Windows 10, and I thought it would be a good time to install Office 2013 Pro. From what I'm reading on the Internet is not as simple as saving my .pst from 2010 and copying over the .pst like I always did when I had to reinstall office 2010.
I wouldn't copy the pst over the old one - but when you add the account to the profile, either choose manual setup and select the pst or use auto account setup and then click manually configure and select the pst (first screenshot: Moving Outlook to a new Windows computer then step 5).

If you use an account that supports imap, autoaccount setup will add it as imap - you'll need to use manual setup if you want to use POP. Notye that if you use imap, outlook 2013 and up can set the imap data file as default but you risk losing calendar and contacts. using a pst as default will store calendar and contacts in the pst instead.


Is there going to be a problem going from 2010 to 2013 Pro and keeping all my emails, contacts and calendars?
Nope. You just need to add the pst to the profile and set it as default - while its better to add it before you use the profile, you can add it later and change the delivery location.

If there are any tutorials out there that show how to go from Outlook 2010 to Outlook 2013 Pro I would appreciate if somebody could direct me to the tutorials.
The link you posted applies to outlook 2010 and up - both just moving and moving/upgrading.
 

e_a_g_l_e_p_i

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2010 32 bit
Email Account
POP3
Diane,
thank you for answering my questions more directly it makes sense to me now. So it would be no different than setting up Outlook 2010 manually where it allows you to select the PST that you want to use.

Using POP3 sounds like it would be an advantage over using IMAP for me, I'm just used to POP3 and would prefer to use it in less there is a disadvantage.

It sounds like it's should be relatively easy just install office 2013 create a new profile then manually configure it, select the .pst and everything should be in the new Outlook 2013 as it is in my 2010.
Thanks

Ron
 

Diane Poremsky

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2016 32 bit
Email Account
Office 365 Exchange
So it would be no different than setting up Outlook 2010 manually where it allows you to select the PST that you want to use.
Correct. Even the dialogs are mostly identical - just the colors are different.

Using POP3 sounds like it would be an advantage over using IMAP for me, I'm just used to POP3 and would prefer to use it in less there is a disadvantage.
if you use a smartphone, imap is generally better but what you are used to can be a factor - i have a lot of clients who are more comfortable with pop3 and don't want to switch.

It sounds like it's should be relatively easy just install office 2013 create a new profile then manually configure it, select the .pst and everything should be in the new Outlook 2013 as it is in my 2010.
Yes. This much really hasn't changed much between version.
 

e_a_g_l_e_p_i

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2010 32 bit
Email Account
POP3
One last question before I make this conversion to 2013 Pro, will emails that I have save into my hard drive from Outlook 2010 open in 2013 Pro? I know you said everything is pretty much the same but I'd rather be safe than sorry and asked the dumb question, and get a direct answer.

I do appreciate the time you spend replying to my posts.
 

e_a_g_l_e_p_i

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2010 32 bit
Email Account
POP3
Hello Diane,
I've been watching tutorials on Outlook 2013 and so far I'm not seeing what I want to see and I'm reminding myself why I never installed it after I got it. They've taken a lot of features mostly visual out of Outlook it seems. From the tutorials them seeing you can only have white or silver as the interface colors, another thing that I'm seeing is the way people are showing how to set it up is completely opposite of the way I like it.

In Outlook 2010 I don't use conversation threads I just have single-line emails with no previews and I answer my emails and delete them, so I don't keep them as people might do in a business. I guess my one question that will make it or break it for me as far as whether I'm going to install Office 2013 is is it possible to make Outlook 2013 look as far as layout the same as Outlook 2010, I will upload a screenshot that I've obviously edited for privacy but you can see that I use single-line emails with my folders on the left in my calendar with upcoming events showing. I basically only use my calendar and mail. I can get over Outlook 2013 not being as colorful as 2010, however if I can set it up the way I like it I won't be able to get over that and I won't install it. Don't pay attention to the letters that are on the top that look out of place I use Dragon naturally speaking to dictate rather than type, for some reason Dragon put those letters up there and I didn't see before I saved the edited screenshot.

Once again I appreciate your prompt replies,

Ron
 

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e_a_g_l_e_p_i

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2010 32 bit
Email Account
POP3
I apologize for the typos above I tried to edit but I was passed a 10 minute time limit so I was unable edit it I think you built a get the gist of what I was saying. I guess that's the downfall when you're using a dictation software and you're relying on it being accurate.
 

Diane Poremsky

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2016 32 bit
Email Account
Office 365 Exchange
You can get close... except for the colors - that is the major change between versions. Colors are a bit better in 2016, although not by much.

For the benefit of others - you can turn off multiline preview on the view tab.

This is from 2016 (with an Exchange Account, so there are a few extra buttons) but Message preview is in the same location, to the left of the arrangement chunk.
preview.png
 

e_a_g_l_e_p_i

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2010 32 bit
Email Account
POP3
After doing a lot of research on office 2013 Pro I've decided to just reinstall office 2010, it's much easier and it's more to my liking.

I just want to make sure I'm doing this right, it's a way I've done it in the past so I believe it's the correct way but I want to make sure and double check with you.

Before my fresh install of my new Windows 10 I plan to save my .pst to a thumb drive then once I install Windows 10, then office 2010 and create an account, then I plan to copy my saved .pst over the newly created one that I set up in Outlook 2010.

Is at the proper way to get all my email messages up to date prior to doing the install and also getting mount calendars and contacts. If there's a better way could you please let me know, I can set this way is always worked for me but I'm not hundred percent sure it's a proper way and I would hate to lose anything.

Thank you

Ron
 

Diane Poremsky

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2016 32 bit
Email Account
Office 365 Exchange
Before my fresh install of my new Windows 10 I plan to save my .pst to a thumb drive then once I install Windows 10, then office 2010 and create an account, then I plan to copy my saved .pst over the newly created one that I set up in Outlook 2010.

Is at the proper way to get all my email messages up to date prior to doing the install and also getting mount calendars and contacts. If there's a better way could you please let me know, I can set this way is always worked for me but I'm not hundred percent sure it's a proper way and I would hate to lose anything.
That will work, but it's recommended you set up the profile and select the correct pst as you set up the profile.
 

e_a_g_l_e_p_i

Senior Member
Outlook version
Outlook 2010 32 bit
Email Account
POP3
So you mean during setup chose my saved .pst ? instead of copying it over the new formed .pst ?
Thanks
Ron
 
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